Tag Archive: farms

Big Bear Camp to Walker Point Weekend

Trip Report:
Leader: Mark Hougardy
Group: Obsidians
Dates: September 10-11, 2016
Participants: 10
Hiking 8 miles
Type: Day Hike & Tent Camping

Visiting Big Bear Camp is like inhaling a fresh breath of forest air: it’s invigorating.

blog-2016-09-14-01That’s me with the apple. The lodge’s owners Hal and Tonia quickly welcomed us as we arrived at their retreat/garden/camp in the woods. Hal offered us delicious Honey Crisp apples directly off the tree to enjoy on our hike. [Photo by Darko]

blog-2016-09-14-02Our 8-mile hike started up a reclaimed forest road, past cedar trees used by mountain lions for scratching, across the deep ravine where a rope was needed (shown), and finally to a deceptively steep forest road.

blog-2016-09-14-03After a good heart-pounding climb, we arrived at the “Secret Spot,” the highest location within the Coast Range in Lane County. We had climbed roughly 1,600 feet from where we started but the view made up for it. Looking east we could see 130+ miles in the distance: in the north, Mt Hood, followed by Mt, Jefferson, Three-Fingered Jack, North, Middle and South Sister, Mt. Bachelor, and finally 125 miles further south, Diamond Peak.

blog-2016-09-14-04We rested, enjoyed some lunch, and then traversed back down the forest road to several turnoffs, and a forest trail that deposited us back at Big Bear. That evening we shared a potluck with neighbors; everyone’s gardens were abundant and we and enjoyed the bounty of harvest-time meals. Later that evening we enjoyed guitar folk music by the fire and enjoyed freshly picked grapes (shown below). In the morning we hung out, explored the local creek, enjoyed the garden, and planned a route for a 42-mile, 4-day backpacking trip to the coast for next spring.
blog-2016-09-14-05

Breakfast on the Farm

When traveling in Europe ask the locals about farms that serve meals. It is a great way to eat fresh food, discover someplace new and experience the countryside. During a trip to Tirol, Austria, we found a farm that served breakfast. There are many such farms in the Alps but this particular one was in the village of Mühlau, a district of Innsbruck, Austria. Breakfast is offered to the public on select Saturday mornings, and the locals suggested we arrive - earlier the better - as it was a very popular location. We managed to catch a ride that morning. As the car drove quickly through the narrow streets of Mühlau not many people were out. Many of the houses had yards and bright and bountiful looking gardens. Several farms were in the area, but they integrated well with the houses and with other buildings in the town. A large green space weaved its way into the town and it was hard to tell where the town ended and the farms and green space began. We arrived outside a small green yard with a sturdy looking house and several large wooden barns. Attached to the house was a newer section made of wood and glass. We entered through a heavy wooden door that swung inward, the inside building was made of a light colored wood with windows near the ceiling which allowed in an abundance of natural light. The room was clean and basic in design. A crucifix hung on one wall. Inside the room were nine or ten long tables, each with accompanying wooden benches at the sides. At these tables were maybe 80 people eating with a plate of food. The breakfast assortment included traditional items: homemade fresh bread, freshly made jam, slices of thin meat, speck, yogurt, cheese, fresh milk, some fruit, hard boiled eggs and cups of coffee. A small line of folks were standing in front of a serving table that included baskets and serving plates. The line was held up because a basket of some critical food item was out. At that moment a woman, emerged from a recessed back room, scurried over and refilled the basket of bread. Then another person, this time a child, ran over with clean mugs to refill the inventory, then another child walked over with a plate of cheeses. Then an older woman came out, this was the Mom; she straightened a few things, looked around and instructed the kids to work on some other items. The atmosphere in the dinning hall was relaxed and the people eating were content. Almost everyone there were locals. A small sign with the letters ‘wc’ (water closet) hung on a large, carved wooden door. Opening the door you walked through a storage area that included a variety of farm implements and boxes of dried food, here was an inside door that opened into the family’s house! There was a hand scrawled sign on the wall, that looked like a child hurriedly wrote it, with the letters ‘wc’ and an arrow. The arrow pointed to a small guest bathroom. I could hear a TV in one room and people talking from another room. It was an odd feeling just walking into to someone’s house. I was surprised that so many guests visited this house, yet the facilities remained very clean; it was also surprising that the family allowed strangers into where they lived. Everyone visiting the small, local farm was courteous and treated the place and each other with respect. It was a refreshing experience. When we finished our breakfast we found the farm Mom and paid for our meals. The cost was €7.50 (about $10) person. She invited us to look around outside. The big barn was inhabited by 4 large brown cows and nearby we heard chickens, but they were cooped up because of all the visitors. We looked for horses, but a sign said they were up on the mountain. The kids who were visiting the farm enjoyed petting some bunnies and guinea pigs. It was great being in the city and enjoying some good fresh and locally produced food.

When traveling in Europe ask the locals about farms that serve meals. It is a great way to eat fresh food, discover someplace new and experience the countryside.

During a trip to Tirol, Austria, we found a farm that served breakfast. There are many such farms in the Alps but this particular one was in the village of Mühlau, a district of Innsbruck, Austria. Breakfast is offered to the public on select Saturday mornings, and the locals suggested we arrive – earlier the better – as it was a very popular location.

We managed to catch a ride that morning. As the car drove quickly through the narrow streets of Mühlau not many people were out. Many of the houses had yards and bright and bountiful looking gardens. Several farms were in the area, but they integrated well with the houses and with other buildings in the town. A large green space weaved its way into the town and it was hard to tell where the town ended and the farms and green space began.

We arrived outside a small green yard with a sturdy looking house and several large wooden barns. Attached to the house was a newer section made of wood and glass. We entered through a heavy wooden door that swung inward, the inside building was made of a light colored wood with windows near the ceiling which allowed in an abundance of natural light. The room was clean and basic in design. A crucifix hung on one wall. Inside the room were nine or ten long tables, each with accompanying wooden benches at the sides. At these tables were maybe 80 people eating with a plate of food. The breakfast assortment included traditional items: homemade fresh bread, freshly made jam, slices of thin meat, speck, yogurt, cheese, fresh milk, some fruit, hard boiled eggs and cups of coffee.

A small line of folks were standing in front of a serving table that included baskets and serving plates. The line was held up because a basket of some critical food item was out. At that moment a woman, emerged from a recessed back room, scurried over and refilled the basket of bread. Then another person, this time a child, ran over with clean mugs to refill the inventory, then another child walked over with a plate of cheeses. Then an older woman came out, this was the Mom; she straightened a few things, looked around and instructed the kids to work on some other items.

The atmosphere in the dinning hall was relaxed and the people eating were content. Almost everyone there were locals.

A small sign with the letters ‘wc’ (water closet) hung on a large, carved wooden door. Opening the door you walked through a storage area that included a variety of farm implements and boxes of dried food, here was an inside door that opened into the family’s house! There was a hand scrawled sign on the wall, that looked like a child hurriedly wrote it, with the letters ‘wc’ and an arrow. The arrow pointed to a small guest bathroom. I could hear a TV in one room and people talking from another room. It was an odd feeling just walking into to someone’s house.

I was surprised that so many guests visited this house, yet the facilities remained very clean; it was also surprising that the family allowed strangers into where they lived.

Everyone visiting the small, local farm was courteous and treated the place and each other with respect. It was a refreshing experience.

When we finished our breakfast we found the farm Mom and paid for our meals. The cost was €7.50 (about $10) person. She invited us to look around outside.

The big barn was inhabited by 4 large brown cows and nearby we heard chickens, but they were cooped up because of all the visitors. We looked for horses, but a sign said they were up on the mountain. The kids who were visiting the farm enjoyed petting some bunnies and guinea pigs.

It was great being in the city and enjoying some good fresh and locally produced food.

Find Fresh Food at the Markthalle in Innsbruck

Find Fresh Food at the Markthalle in Innsbruck

Eating healthy foods can be a problem when traveling. Dealing with a different schedule, an unfamiliar language, and the lack of a kitchen means that most meals come in the form of a ready-made sandwich or dining out. Often, this food may not be prepared with the healthiest of ingredients. When I explore I deliberately seek out places that offer fresh food – and places recommended by locals.

One great location for fresh food in Innsbruck, Austria, is the Markthalle. The Markthalle offers a place for farmers and small businesses to gather under one roof; it is a big warehouse packed with fresh food, colorful vegetables and fruits, recently harvested meats, fresh baked bread, decadent deserts and several places to grab a decent cup of coffee. The weekends are especially busy as both vendors and customers flock to the market.

The Markthalle Innsbruck is just a block from Altstadt (Old Town), the heart of the city. The market is located next to the river close to the Innbrücke (Bridge over the Inn) and Market Square.

The hours are:
Mon – Fri: 7:00 am – 6:30 pm
Sat: 7:00 am – 1:00 pm
Sun: closed

For more information visit their website (the site is in German):
http://www.markthalle-innsbruck.at/index.php

Tirol’s Heumandl – The Man of Hay

Tirol’s Heumandl - The Man of Hay

When visiting the countryside of Austria’s Tirol keep an eye open for the “Heumandl” or the “Man of Hay.”

At first glance, this two-meter (7 feet) tall shape looks like person standing in a farm field. When many of these shapes are together they appear like an amassed army ready to march into the village beyond.

But, look closer, these forms are actually stacks of freshly harvested hay.

A Heumandl begins with a skeletal form, called a Hiefler. The ones I saw were made of wood and had a 2 meter tall center staff that supported two sets of four ‘branches.’ Each branch group was about one-quarter and three-quarters of the way up the main staff.

At harvest time when the grass is about half a meter in height it is cut and stacked on the Hieflers to dry. After the grass has dried it is collected and stored. During the cold wintertime the cattle and animals can enjoy the bounty of this summer harvest.

The locals mentioned this form of harvesting hay is becoming rare; more and more it is an infrequent sight to see.

This photo was taken in July near the village of St. Sigmund im Sellrain, about 20 km (13 miles) northwest of Innsbruck.

Savoring the Experience at Eugene’s Farmers Market

The Lane County Farmers Market–

  • Traces its history back to 1915
  • Features over 85 growers and producers
  • Offers produce that is often less than 24 hours of being harvested

The market has a long history of providing jobs and locally produced food for the community.

blog-2011-05-26-img-01During a springtime road trip through Oregon’s Willamette Valley, I was offered a delicious opportunity to experience local and farm fresh food while visiting Eugene. Over the years of traveling in Oregon I had always found myself returning to the Eugene area, yet once again I was finding my time limited. I decided to make the best of those few hours and visit the local farmers market.

It was a Saturday morning and I walked about 15 minutes from my motel to the corners of 8th and Oak Streets. The evening before there had been a gentle rain giving the sidewalk and surrounding buildings a pristine sheen. The air was cool and moist but there was gentle warmth that hinted summer was near.

Ahead was a bustle of activity; there was a small city of tents, cars were being unloaded, people were milling about, and I could hear music. A woman passed me; she was carrying a large cotton bag that had been stuffed with greens, the vegetables were so abundant they appeared to be surging over the bag’s edge.

I had arrived at the downtown Farmer’s Market, officially known as the Lane County Farmers Market. As I walked up to the first grouping of booths I could not deny the abundance of colors: a color pallet of orange from the carrots, a gradient of white to green from the asparagus, and the rosy red blush of turnips. Nearby were grouping of dark leaves that sprawled across several displays, each bunch was vibrant and sturdy – it was a small forest of salad.

A man passed by, he carried a flat filled with produce and presented it to a woman behind their display. The farmers were surprisingly healthy looking with pink-cheeks, and well defined statures. Mostly, though I noticed their smiles; it was obvious they loved their work.

The time was now mid-morning and the market was just starting to kick into a higher gear. Everyone was lively and embraced the good ‘vibes’ of the morning air.

A dark-haired girl gently swayed her head to the melody she crafted with her violin. The open case at her feet welcomed donations from her milling audience.

There was a table covered with a red checkerboard cloth, upon it was a small display of eggs, each egg had a slight, yet distinct variation from the next; some were tan, others were red, some were speckled. As I observed them a woman wearing a sun hat came up, plunked down her money and spoke to the owner by name, she wanted 2 cartons. The scene reminded me of a cowboy swaggering up to the bar of an old saloon. The owner reached into one of the coolers, that was behind the table, and gave the woman 2 dozen fresh eggs.

A wood-fired pizza oven gently puffed a thin trail of smoke into the sky; it was still being warmed in preparation for lunch.

A waft of aromatic goodness and a sizzle from an iron skillet was seductively compelling. I peered over splashguard of a booth’s display; a man had just added several types of veggies and garlic to a masterful looking egg creation. It appeared as though this dish could rival a similar meal from a high-end restaurant.

Finally, my eyes and tummy got the better of me. I had to sample some of this amazing food, but I was in a quandary, of the amazing choices what should I eat? Finally, I decided, and then I ate well.

Afterwards, I stepped through a well-worn door and into the red-bricked and cozy Park St. Café; one of the neighboring locally owned businesses.

I enjoyed a delicious cup of coffee, read the paper, and watched the market unfold until it was time for me to return to my motel and grab my bags. For several minutes I had noticed a family outside the window, a curious child was at their side, the parent’s were carrying bags full of bread and vegetables. They appeared to be waiting for someone. I tipped the cup and savored the last few rich drops, both of coffee and of my time at the market. The family started to smile and they welcomed some friends who had just arrived, giving warm hugs to each other. As I sat the cup down, it was decided. This was a place where I wanted to spend my time.

The market has a long history of providing jobs, and locally produced food for the community; but look deeper, it’s the embodiment of a connection to the land, to friends, and with neighbors.

To learn more visit:
http://lanecountyfarmersmarket.org
http://www.parkstcafe.com

Celebrating Food, Family and the Summer Solstice at Live Earth Farm

Where does your food come from? Farmer Tom and his family at Live Earth Farm in Watsonville, California, opened their farm during the Summer Solstice so customers, visitors and the curious could connect with the land and meet the people who grow their food.

Baby GoatThis is a great family outing. Our daughter really enjoyed the goat milking demonstration where she and other children were offered a hands-on opportunity to participate. All of us enjoyed meeting and petting goats, but the star attraction was a very cute three-week old baby goat that just loved sitting on laps.

Fresh BreadPersonally, I enjoyed the bread making demonstration in an adobe oven. I had seen the oven filled with red-hot coals earlier in the day but now the aroma of baking bread caught my attention. Several families were helping and learning about baking bread. All of us eagerly watched as a small door on the adobe oven was opened and fresh, hot bread was removed. It was quickly devoured.

That afternoon we occupied ourselves exploring the farm and picking blackberries and strawberries in several fields. We also joined in on a demonstration about cheese making. The kids soon discovered the large hay fort and a large cooler of strawberry juice (the real stuff). Then came the hayride.

Families Picking PeppersFarmer Tom led families on a tractor pulled haycart through the farm to the upper fields passing peppers, wheat, apricots and eggplants. More than a ride, this was a hands-on tour of the farm. A favorite for the kids was riding on the tractor and sampling the wheat berries from a ready to harvest field of golden colored wheat.

BonfireAfter the hayride we sat on a hill braiding garlic and enjoying the day with the longest amount of daylight of the year. The weather was pleasant. From our vantage point we could overlook several farms and beyond to the green Santa Cruz Mountains. A hawk flew low observing us before returning to higher altitudes.

In the evening there was a potluck dinner followed by a bonfire. The talented marimba band Kuzanga played well into the evening as families danced, socialized and enjoyed being outside. Several kids were amazed that one of the musicians had to stand on a three-foot tall stool just to play the largest and deepest sounding of the marimbas.

The sun had just set and the evening was cooling. Our family and our friends headed home. All of us were tired yet happy after a full day at the farm. We left with full tummies, our fresh picked berries, braids of garlic and great memories.

Learn more and continue your own explorations of the Live Earth Farm. Live Earth Farm is focused on Community Supported Agriculture were the customer agrees to buy a part of the farm’s organically grown, in-season harvest and in return the farm commits to growing high-quality veggies, fruits and herbs. The farm delivers a bountiful portion of the harvest every week to a neighborhood location for pickup by customers