A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week

If you ever have the opportunity to experience San Francisco’s Fleet Week, it is a blast!

I arrived with my family at the SS Jeremiah O’Brien on a Sunday morning. The O’Brien is “one of two remaining fully functional Liberty ships of the 2,710 built and launched during WW II.” At the pier, we showed our tickets, A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week had our backpacks briefly inspected, and we walked up the gangplank. We joined about 950 other people on-board that day to experience Fleet Week, a time during the middle of October when active military ships dock in San Francisco, California. The passengers of the O’Brien would be enjoying the events that day from the middle of San Francisco Bay.

About a quarter of the passengers wore caps identifying they had served in the military over the years, while some caps stated, “Korean War Veteran” or “Desert Storm Veteran”, many had caps stating the names of various naval vessels.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet WeekAt 10 am a deep yet high pitched ‘Bhwaaahh’ and a river of steam gushed from the ship’s turret. Gigantic ropes that held the ship fast were brought aboard and a tugboat helped to pull the 441 foot long Liberty Ship from the dock. Looking over the aft of the ship I could see sheets of spray being ejected from the water every second as the massive propeller chopped through the water. We were underway.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week Our first treat that morning was seeing the Golden Gate Bridge up close. This massive structure dwarfed the O’Brien as the ship chugged under the mile-long span and out in the Pacific. After a few minutes, we turned and returned under the bridge to parallel the San Francisco waterfront. There was a definite presence of the security: police and military boats skittered quickly over the water to create a boundary area, an exclusion zone, for the aircraft to perform that had to be free of boats.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week The O’Brien was the only ship to parade in front of the waterfront that day. The day before the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) a supercarrier, the USS Antietam (CG-54) a guided missile cruiser, the USS Milius (DDG-69) a guided missile destroyer and a number of naval vessels, entered San Francisco Bay in a Parade of Ships with the O’Brien bringing up the back; as we skirted down A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week the waterfront and under the second massive bridge in the bay, the Bay Bridge, we passed many of these ships now at port. In the distance, anchored in the middle of the bay the impressive and intimidating looking supercarrier, the USS Carl Vinson. Around all of the ships were gray-colored military patrol boats protecting the perimeter of their respective vessels.

After a closer, yet still distant look at the Carl Vinson, the O’Brien chugged back under the Bay Bridge. It was time for the air show to start and within a few minutes, a tight group of sleek looking planes descended in a A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week tight arc over our heads and into the exclusion zone we had traversed earlier. At first, it was hard for us to view the air show but the O’Brien positioned itself between Alcatraz Island and the Bay Bridge; this location allowed us to look down the two or three-mile long ‘channel’ of where the planes would be performing.

A number of planes performed that day, too many to respectfully give credit in this short write up, but all were magnificent. Just a few a mentioned below.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week The sleek Red and White Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Snowbirds soared overhead. These individual aircraft moved as one organism in the sky, with often only a few feet from each other. When they separated each became a unique part of the whole in performing their choreographed maneuvers. At times it appeared the planes were playing a game of chicken turning to the side at the last second as they zipped past each other.

Then came an F-18 Super Hornet. It roared overhead passing several hundred feet at times over the O’Brien. Once, it moved slowly over the water, with its nose pointed high to the sky, it seemed to hang in the air for several seconds then shot away as though catapulted away by an unseen slingshot. It disappeared into the blue… everyone looked around, we could not see it. About half a minute passed and we started to think this part of the air show had ended. It was unusually quiet…

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week A thunderous and encompassing roar ripped through the air – splitting the solitude. The sound made the O’Brien shudder and scared the life out of everyone. The passengers looked up to see the gray F-18 several hundred feet overhead slicing like a great axe through the air-water vapor was rapidly condensing at the back of the wings creating a white cloud that followed the jet. In just a second or two the fighter was already distant – the white cloud now appeared to be a gigantic cone that enveloped the back of the plane – yellow and red fire spewed from the engines and the cone still seemed to grow wider. Now the thunderous sound caught up to us, the sound grew deeper, louder and could be felt in one’s chest. The plane now appeared to be halfway to the Golden Gate Bridge a distance of several miles, we still had to cover our ears because the noise was so loud. The jet pulled up and disappeared in a fog bank that seemed to appear off the ocean from nowhere.

Everyone on the O’Brien was silent.

Then someone giggled aloud, followed by others laughing, then people began to speak with exclamations of “Wow!” At that moment nine-hundred plus people on the O’Brien were smiling.

A few minutes later a sudden cold wind, that must have been 30 miles an hour, hit everyone in the face and it did not let up. The Stars and Stripes that rested atop the mast had been still for much of the morning, but now the colorful banner flew straight out to the side. The fog bank on the horizon moved closer and started to blanket one of the tall towers of the Golden Gate.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week A United Airlines 747 was seen low in the north, it banked right, flew next to the Bay Bridge then between the O’Brien and San Francisco. Some laughed as to why a commercial jet was in an air show, but as this massive plane flew over us, they stopped laughing. It is one thing to see such a huge jet at the airport, but when it is directly over you…you get an appreciation for the scale and presence. The jet made three passes for the spectators, just a few hundred feet over the water, and on the last pass pulled up extremely tight climbing into the sky.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet WeekA sleek looking F15-E Strike Eagle dominated the sky, it too made a number of passes, rolls, dives, and maneuvers to showcase its dexterity. Again the people of the O’Brien loved the show.

The fog bank was still closing in, hid many of the ships and sailboats that were on the bay water. The wind grew still more intense. People of the O’Brien A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week sought shelter behind walls and side rails to shield them from the wind. Most were not prepared for the sudden change in weather.

The massive Cargo Support Plane (I believe a C-117) for the Blue Angels passed nearby, it made several passes to introduce the highly-skilled flight team, but it was obvious the fog was going to be a problem. The fog now completely covered the massive Golden Gate Bridge and had engulfed half of the area in which the Blue Angels were to perform.

As the support plane left a deep ‘sshhhoooo’ of engines announced the Blue Angles as they flew past. The sleek blue and gold planes made multiple passes of the area traveling in wide circles, apparently studying the foggy theater of activity before deciding on a plan of action. Then they returned and in a tight formation made a slow and respectful pass between the waterfront packed with spectators and the O’Brien before leaving. The air show had concluded.

The inability to see was a safety issue not only for the pilots but for the public. Everyone on board the O’Brien was sad to see the Blue Angles leave early, but no one spoke badly about their decision, everyone understood that safety was paramount.

As the show ended the exclusion zone on the water was no longer needed, a thousand sailboats and small vessels moved in every direction like water striders moving in all directions across the San Francisco Bay to return home. That alone was an amazing sight.

A View From the Bay at San Francisco’s Fleet Week The O’Brien spent the next thirty minutes slowly maneuvering back to its berth. The volunteer deckhands wrestled giant sized and intertwined ropes to secure the ship. After fifteen minutes or so the gangplank went down and we disembarked.

It had been a fantastic day on a historic WW II ship, being in the company of so many who have served their country over the decades, while seeing some amazing aircraft piloted by very skilled pilots. I was very thankful for that day and having the opportunity to enjoy it with my family in a free country.

To those reading this who have served, or are serving in the U.S. armed forces, “Thank you for your service.”

Reference:
SS Jeremiah O’Brien website.

Learn More:
http://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org
http://www.fleetweek.us

Wings of Freedom

Small and large airplanes fly over my house all the time, but when I heard the deep sounding and powerful “WWWwwrrrrhh” of propellers overhead I knew it was something special. Looking up I saw a World War II-era bomber plowing through the sky. “Wow!”

A quick web search revealed wartime era airplanes were at a local airstrip and they could be toured. This was a golden opportunity to introduce my young daughter to a part of history.

TP-51C Mustang called Betty JaneWe arrived on the tarmac and saw three planes: single prop TP-51C Mustang called “Betty Jane” and two large bombers.

Betty Jane was silver in color with a sleek design; she was tightly built for speed and highly polished so that sunlight gleaned of her exterior occasionally blinding those who dare to look upon her. Some partition tape kept onlookers several steps back; this was a ‘look but don’t touch’ aircraft.

B-24J LiberatorThe B-24J Liberator sat further afield. This aircraft was stoutly and solid in appearance and looked as though it could take some solid punches if needed – it could also hit back with its 10 .50 caliber machine guns. It was a good-sized plane with 67 feet in length and a wingspan of 110 feet. Visitors could climb/walk through the plane via a small entrance at the rear. Inside it was Spartan with exposed cables and ribs of the airplane showing. Continuing through the plane was a large bay filled B-24J Liberatorwith replica bombs the girth of watermelons and about three feet long. A skinny catwalk in the middle of the bay, about six inches wide, was the only walkway to the other side. This was not scary when walking several feet off the ground, but what about when you’re several thousand feet up in the air? At the other side was the cockpit, with a variety of levers and switches. The Liberator could carry up to 28,500 pounds of weaponry – that is equivalent to the weight of 7 modern cars each weighing 4,000 pounds each! The Liberator is the only restored flying B-24J in the world.

B-17G Flying FortressThe next plane we visited was the elegant and formidable looking B-17G Flying Fortress. This is aircraft is often featured in movies and what people frequently think of when they hear of a Word War II bomber. Although this plane is somewhat pleasant to view it should be remembered it is a machine of war with 13 .50 caliber machine guns. The Flying Fortress is about 75 feet in length with a wingspan of 104 feet; this workhorse could carry up to 35,865 pounds of weaponry – that is almost equivalent to the weight of 9 modern cars each weighing 4,000 pounds each!

Visitors climb in through a ladder at the front of the plane. You can see in the front gunner’s position and also the compact looking cockpit. Like its sister plane, the inside is cramped and utilitarian – space was not wasted on conveniences. A small catwalk leads people through the bomb bay and you have to steady yourself with a rope handrail. Here you can see the ball-shaped lower gunner’s turret and get a feeling for just how small, claustrophobic and even terrifying this position must have been. Next were the B-17G Flying Fortressside gunner’s stations and their large .50 caliber machine guns complete with replica bandoliers, filled with bullets the size of lipstick containers, that fed into the movable (but non-functioning) machine guns.

Inside the B-17G Flying FortressAt one point a mechanic pulled off the cowlings over an engine and completed some work on an engine. He was readying the plane for a flight that afternoon for visitors.

We toured the planes several more times, walked around and underneath them and thoroughly enjoyed the visit.

Later that day, while at home, I again heard multiple propellers with a deep sounding and powerful “WWWwwrrrrhh” overhead. Directly overhead was the Flying Fortress that I had seen earlier that day. It really was something special. I am glad I had the opportunity to see it and introduce a family member to this part of history.

In the sky a B-17G Flying FortressThese aircraft have been recovered and restored by the Collings Foundation, a group that preserves machines that helped build the world and helped keep it free. Visitors can tour the planes on the ground and experience them while in flight. Check the foundation’s website for tour locations, dates and prices.

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