Kayaking While Surrounded by an Ocean of Sand

Trip Report:
Leader: Mark Hougardy | Organization: Obsidians | Date: May 2019 | Duration: 1 days | Participants: 7 | Type: kayaking

Kayaking Oregon’s Siltcoos River during the springtime is a treat, provided you can time it right. A day earlier dark clouds, lighting, and sheets of rain pelted the area. But, today, the temperature was warm and the sky was clear, allowing us to witness the Siltcoos in all its splendor. We were fortunate and very thankful. The Siltcoos is an interesting interplay of a riparian area within the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. The dunes are one of the largest expanses of temperate coastal sand dunes in the world. When geologic forces created the dunes, the sand-choked off several coastal rivers and created about 30 lakes. Some of the rivers have found a way back to sea, the Siltcoos River is one of these rivers. Today, it is a slow-moving three-mile long waterway that holds the distinction of being a canoe trail. We were unable to visit the lower water dam because of a large fallen tree. A special thank you to the River House Outdoor Center of Eugene for the use of their kayaks and local guides. From the water, our group saw at least 18 animal species: bald eagle, osprey, a grey fox, swallows, killdeer, newt, bumble bee, heron, fish, stellar’s jay, crow, seals, egrets, mergansers, butterflies, dragonflies, spiders, and egrets. We also saw a dog at the bow of a kayak, and (not paying attention to posted signs) a human and dog in a protected area.

An 80-foot wall of sand along a bend in the river.
Upriver there were a number of fallen and downed trees we gave them a wide berth.
The dunes gave way to open spaces and a green marsh. Several ducks were flying overhead.
A large bird turned in our direction. As it approached we saw a white head and white tail feathers – it was a bald eagle! A magnificent sight, and seeing it was worth all the money in the world at that moment.
The river widened as we approached the mouth of the Siltcoos River.
At the mouth of the Siltcoos River. The Pacific Ocean had 4-6 foot swells that day. A bald eagle was observed looking for a mid-afternoon snack in the surf. Note the white tail feathers. The area before us (all the shoreline in the area) was closed to protect habitat for the Snowy Plover, a threatened species. Photo credit: Anna Hougardy.
A happy trip participant

Listening to Oregon’s Kalapuya Talking Stones

Talking Stone LI-YUU (Prairie)

Trip Report – Leader: Mark Hougardy; Group: Obsidians; Dates: April 2019; Participants: 16; Type: Urban & Trail Walking

Imagine attending a great celebration. Every year 100 people gather to laugh, tell stories, eat good food, and celebrate. At the conclusion of the festival, everyone erupts into a joyous and lengthy song, but this music is special because for it to be harmonious each person is responsible for contributing just one note. The song rises and flows with many voices as older members share and the young participate. The following year there is another celebration but a people few are missing, the next year others don’t attend and the melody starts to fray. For decades this unraveling of the song continues, as fewer people are around to sing. After one hundred years only two people remain. They sing, but how do they celebrate the song with so many notes missing? …How would you?

In the early 1800s, the Kalapuya people numbered around 15,000 and were the largest Native American group in what is now known as the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. Diseases introduced to the area decimated the population and by 1850 about 1,000 people remained. In 1900, the Kalapuya numbered about 300 (2% of the original population) and by the 1950s the last generation of speakers had passed. A 1977 University of Oregon anthropological paper declared, “the Kalapuya population is now presumed extinct.”

This was the setting for Esther Stutzman, a woman of Kalapuya heritage who wanted to revive the language. Over the years she made incremental steps to build awareness about the Kalapuya and awaken the language, but even into the early 1990’s she was told by academics to not even bother – the language was dead. One reason for this difficulty was the geographic connection to Kalapuya place names no longer existed; all the landmarks had been given names by pioneers. Esther eventually partnered with the Citizen Planning Committee of East Alton Baker Park. Together, they convinced Willamalane Parks and Recreation and City of Eugene to re-associate place names with Kalapuya words and phrases. The 237-acre park was re-named the Whilamut Natural Area of Alton Baker Park, and a year later, they placed cultural art installations known as the Kalapuya Talking Stones.

The Talking Stones are etched boulders that carry a Kalapuya word from one of the several dialects that describe the location where the stone’s reside. Today, fifteen stones quietly speak with those who will listen from along riverside trails in the Whilamut Natural Area in Eugene and the Eastgate Woodlands of Springfield, Oregon.

Talking Stone GUDU-KUT (frog)

The stones are etched with a simple font that approximates being written by a human finger as though an elder has just shared an idea by drawing a concept in the earth.

Placing the stones required years of work, public education, and patience from Esther and often-unsung heroes on the Citizen Planning Committee (CPC), including Charlotte Behm, Vicky Mello, and David Sonnichsen, and others. The group has spent more than twenty years (as volunteers) diligently working to place and maintain the sacred Talking Stones and to educate the public about their important role in our community. The Talking Stones are a watershed project on blending native place names within metropolitan areas for the education about the people who once lived – and still live – in the area.

Charlotte Behm sharing stories about the creation, installation, and public interactions with the Talking Stones.

To better understand the Talking Stones’ stories Charlotte Behm joined us on our 2.5-hour walk. She shared her experiences and history about the stones and some of the challenges that remain. We were happy to listen and better understand the geographic connection to Kalapuya place names. Thank you, Esther and Charlotte, and the many others for helping to share a larger story with your voices.

An additional thank you to Charlotte Behm for her help with this article.

Additional Resources:
> Kalapuya Talking Stones Brochure & Map (PDF)
> Video: Hunting for History Part 5: The Kalapuya Talking Stones
> Article: “Future of the Kalapuya Story
> Article: “Ancient Oregon Languages Being Nudged Awake
> The “presumed extinct” reference is from publication,”Cultural resource overview of the Willamette National Forest, western Oregon” 1977, #12, (page 79 > actual location in PDF is page 90)

A Story on the Ground – Getting to Know Track Patterns

Understanding how animals move is a basic feature of tracking. When you start to see “the story” written upon the ground you see patterns, infer distances, visualize speed, and even what type of animal made the tracks. Recognizing the gait – the animal’s manner of walking– is key to knowing the story. Here is a simple PDF I developed called, “Getting to Know Track Patterns” to use in the field. I use when I’m interacting with kids (and adults too). It helps to have someone demonstrate these gaits on all fours to visualize the gait. Then try to walk that way for yourself.

America Needs You – Protect Laws That Help Wildlife Artwork

Science-based conservation is under attack! America’s environmental laws and natural treasures are under assault from the incoming administration in Washington. Laws like the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act along with agencies as the Environmental Protection Agency could be gutted – taking America back to a time when pollution and bad water were commonplace. Hard fought protections are going backward. I created this to help artwork to help stand up for the environment and protect future generations. The following artwork is available to friends of the park and related outdoor organizations to advance their local outreach and fundraising during these challenging times. The artist Mark Hougardy can help with products that will aid in these efforts. America and its beauty are worth fighting for! – Copyright Mark Hougardy.

Mark Hougardy’s Image Supports Outreach at Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park is an under-visited companion to other parks in California, however, the beauty does not disappoint. The volcano last erupted in 1915 and the rugged area offers a number of hot springs. Concession user fees are a primary source of funding for the park’s outreach and visitor services. Mark Hougardy’s image was used in park visitors centers from 2004- 2011 and an updated version is being planned.

Helping to Build Awareness of California State Parks with 10K Patches

Mark Hougardy, of GlyphGuy LLC, is proud to have supplied California State Park volunteers, Junior Rangers, and enthusiasts with over 10,000 high-quality patches that represent the second largest park system in the United States.

This year (2009) is challenging to the existence of many State Parks in California as the state wrestles with a looming budget deficit and possibly closing over 80% of the parks!

Maintaining the California State Park brand will be key to keeping the park system in the minds and eyes of visitors and voters. We hope that our patches will continue to represent the image and quality deserving of California State Parks.

Mark Hougardy’s Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Image

For three years from 2005-2008 Mark Hougardy’s image of Mount St. Helens was used by the Northwest Interpretive Association to help fund visitor outreach and education services at Mount St. Helens, Washington. Discover Your Northwest (formerly Northwest Interpretive Association) promotes the discovery of Northwest public lands, enriches the experience of visitors, and encourages stewardship of these special places today and for generations to come. Copyright Mark Hougardy.

Point Reyes National Seashores’ Tule Elk Design by Mark Hougardy

For eight years the Point Reyes National Seashore Association produced park stores items from Mark Hougardy’s Tule Elk image. An updated version of the image is shown. For thousands of years, vast numbers of tule elk thrived in the grasslands of central and coastal California. In the mid-1800s, following the gold rush, uncontrolled market hunting and rapid agricultural development nearly drove them to extinction. They were gone from the Point Reyes area by the 1860s. In 1874, the last surviving tule elk (possibly as few as two individuals) were discovered and protected in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Tule elk were reintroduced to Point Reyes National Seashore in 1978. Since then, the elk have grown from 10 animals to nearly 500. There are two separate herds of tule elk at Point Reyes, one in a reserve and one free-roaming herd. The reintroduction of this free-ranging herd is an important step in the ecological restoration in the park.

Año Nuevo State Reserve to Use Mark Hougardy’s Design to Grow Revenue for Visitor Services

Elephant Seals are large, blubbery creatures with elephantine-like noses. Adult males can grow up to 13 feet in length! The seals were once hunted for their oily fat which was used in oil lamps in the 1800s. The demand for their blubber was so intense that their population plummeted and they were thought extinct. Fortunately, a small population survived on an island off the coast of Mexico and over time their population has returned to California. Año Nuevo State Reserve offers a special opportunity to see these creatures up close and in their natural habitat. The image will be used in the visitor center to help generate revenue for visitor engagement and interpretive programs. Copyright Mark Hougardy.

Pigeon Point Light Station State Historic Park to Use Mark Hougardy’s Design

The Pigeon Point Light Station State Historic Park is a feast for the eyes. This landscape is a synergy of nature and an elegantly engineered human-made structure. The 115-foot light station was built in 1871 on this prominent section of the coastline to warn ships of dangerous waters. Today, visitors can enjoy the beautiful setting and whale watch. Mark Hougardy’s design will be used on park store items. Revenue from these sales will be used to help fund park visitor and outreach services. Copyright Mark Hougardy.

Mark Hougardy’s Artwork Selected for the Big Basin Redwoods State Park Centennial Poster

Big Basin Redwoods State Park is California’s first and oldest state park. On June 8, 2002, they kicked off 100 days of celebration that include festivities, hikes, speakers, and interpretive events. Actor Clint Eastwood, who is a newly appointed state park commissioner, gave opening remarks.

Mark Hougardy created the poster representing the Centennial. The family seen in the image was modeled after his family; the child is his daughter, she is two years old. It is Mark’s hope that she will witness the park’s Bicentennial. She will be given a copy of the poster signed by celebrities and dignitaries who attended. The trees visualized in the image are just north of the main building and can be easily seen from the single-track road #236. The poster is very simple in design and the first such project of hopefully more to come. Patches, pins, and postcards will be created with a modified image and used to help fund park outreach and interpretive services.

Big Basin consists of more than 18,000 acres of forests, chaparral, and riparian habitats. It is also home to the largest continuous stand of ancient coast redwoods south of San Francisco. Visitors can enjoy over 80 miles of hiking, biking, and equestrian trails; 181 car camping sites; tent cabins; backpacking camps; and a visitor center.